Author: Biz India

Book Review: Behind the Mask: The Mystique of Surgery and the Surgeons Who Perform Them

Author: David Gelber, MD Publisher: Ruffian Press. 187 pages Book Review by Nano Khilnani I revere surgeons as almost superhuman beings. They go through four years of college, likely another four more years of medical school, two years of internship, and probably another two to four years of residency. But the learning never stops – with reading medical journals, attending medical conferences and conventions and daily practice that reveals cases with new twists to the diseases and organ malfunctions. Keeping constantly updated on the latest developments in their medical specialty is a never-ending part of a surgeon’s life. I also regard them as the closest link to God for humans (besides religious persons)  because it is their knowledge and experience acquired over many years, their discipline and work ethic and dedication to their patients that enable them to keep us alive and avoid death. What else could be a nobler line of work? That is why I wanted to be a doctor when I was in high school. But somehow my life took a different turn, and I turned out becoming a writer. I suppose it does not only take a surgeon way-above-average intellectual capacity to keep learning from new cases, but also an unusually large-range emotional makeup that can withstand tremendous psychological highs and lows and stress on a daily basis. Saving a life gives ineffable satisfaction, but...

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Book Review: Are You Ready to Sell?

Author: Mike Whitney Publisher: AuthorHouse. 264 pages Book Review by Ramu Nakliba Those who are or were in the profession of selling or owning a small business know that one of the most difficult jobs out there is selling. For those who own businesses and are closely involved in selling their products and services, they know that upholding the quality of product or services, as well as providing an excellent overall customer experience is also part and parcel of selling, acquiring and retaining customers, the most critical part of a business. When all these responsibilities are taken together – selling, maintaining product-service quality and ensuring customers remain with your company, the pressure can be overwhelming. And when the business owner is doing all this in the midst of the severest recession the United States is in since the 1930s Great Depression, it is no surprise that nearly 1.6 million businesses filed for bankruptcies in 2010 (bankruptcy cases filed in federal courts for the 12-month period ending December 31, 2010, totaled 1,593,081, up 8.1 percent over the total 2009 bankruptcy filings of 1,473,675, according to the records of the Administrative Office of U.S. Courts). Selling services is a lot more difficult than selling products. When you’re selling services, you are selling a promise to the customer. If you do not deliver on your promise, even through no fault of your...

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Book Review: Ani’s Raw Food Asia

Author: Ani Phyo Publisher: Da Capo – Lifelong Books – 305 pages Book Review by: Laxmi Chaandi It is rare to find books on raw foods. Let’s consider ourselves lucky that we found this one. After all, before man discovered fire, he ate raw plants and fruits – the most natural of foods. That included grains, nuts, legumes and seeds, as time went by. If you count the vast varieties of foods coming up from the ground, which includes root crops, plants and trees, all of those put together far surpass all the different kinds of meats and seafood. Yet meat and seafood dominates the American fare, and vegetables for the most part are simply side dishes. If you grew up in India like I did, plant-based food ruled, and meat was an exception. That has not changed much, especially in the villages and towns, and even in India’s cities. There is such a huge variety of vegetarian food available to enjoy in India and in the other countries of Asia, which many in the Western world are not aware of. Ani’s Raw Food Asia introduces that range of food to the Western palate. You will find a large range of delicious raw food that is also healthy for you. In over 300 pages, you will find drinks and foods for different times of the day: from breakfast breads...

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Book Review: American Wasteland: How America Throws Away Nearly Half Its Food (and What We Can Do About It)

Author: Jonathan Bloom Publisher:  Da Capo-Lifelong Books -366   pages Book Review by:  Sonu Chandiram People living in the United States throw away more than 100 billion pounds of food a  year, enough to end hunger for about 1.7 billion people, or around a quarter of our planet’s nearly seven billion inhabitants today. This wasted food represents about 40 percent to almost half of all the food produced in this country, depending on which source you consult, writes the author of this award-winning, eye-opening book Jonathan Bloom, a journalist. A graphic way of looking at the amount of food wasted daily in he U.S. (if you can imagine it) is that it can fill the Rose Bowl, a football stadium in Pasadena, California with a seating capacity of 90,000 fans. In the course of gathering material for this book Jonathan Bloom worked at many of the places where food waste occurs, especially on a large scale. He observed first hand how and how much food was wasted. The discoveries are shocking. He takes us through the path from our typical food-growing sources – the farms – to the food distribution and consumption destinations – our supermarkets, restaurants and kitchens – and shows us how billions of pounds of food, collectively, are just discarded, while millions of people in other parts of the world are starving and suffer from malnutrition. He...

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Book Review: All the Missing Souls

Author: David Scheffer Publisher: Princeton University Press – 533 pages Book Review by:  Anu Kampa This book is an important segment of the personal story of David Scheffer, a lawyer, who helped change the popular belief that mass killers can get away from paying for heinous crimes against their fellowmen. It is an account of his personal battle against mass murderers and how he helped write into law the provision that heads of state or government officials can no longer use ‘leadership immunity’ to protect themselves from prosecution, imprisonment or execution in international courts of law. One of his most important contributions to humanity was that he created five war crimes tribunals from 1993 to 1996 to bring to justice dictators primarily responsible for large massacres in various parts of the world. Those politico-military leaders, constantly and for many years, used the baseless defense of ‘leadership immunity’ to avoid prosecution, but Scheffer’s admirable efforts “brought to an end the presumption of immunity for atrocity crimes.” Schaffer in effect brought about the new era of ‘credible justice’ wherein punishment is the rightful end result of trials of dictators who became mass murderers. Saddam Hussein of Iraq, for example. The courts of justice he created were: the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, the International Criminal Court, the Rwanda Tribunal, the Special Court for Sierra Leone, and the Yugoslav Tribunal....

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